Things to do in a Commercial Property Management Handover

If you are about to take on a new commercial or retail property from a management perspective, there are things to think about.  There are things to think about and the property management handover is critical to gathering the right information.  Every client and every property will have unique issues to prepare for and ask questions about. (NB – you can get plenty of property management tips in our Snapshot program right here – its free)

 

Handover Importance

There is something to remember here about a property handover and why it is so important; you only have a short period to get the full information about the property and its performance over time.  Questions must be asked of the previous property manager, owner, or tenants.

 

Stay Organised

An organised approach with a checklist as part of a handover process is a good thing to work with.  A checklist will keep you on focus and task for the property type.  Different questions are asked when it comes to the different properties.

So here are my experiences and ideas relating to taking over a complex commercial or retail property.  Preparation is the key to success in capturing all the recent and relevant property detail.  You may be able to add to the list based on the location and the landlord:

  1. Check out the physical aspects of the property – it always helps if you visit the property first before you do other things. The visual aspects of the property will help you significantly with investigations and questions.
  2. Review the tenancy mix – in a property with several tenants, look at the types of businesses, location of each tenant, and the performance of the property for the tenants in situ. Some tenant types put pressures on the property such as security or staff issues.
  3. Review all the leases relating to occupancy – the leases will have unique elements of occupancy to review. All leases should be read; extracts and critical dates should be taken from each lease where you can see important facts impacting occupancy.
  4. Understand the vacancy factors – any vacancy now or in the future is an issue. Resolve vacancies through a tenant retention plan, a marketing plan, or a targeted leasing program.  You can also move existing tenants around the property.  Think outside the square when it comes to tenant movement and placement.
  5. Look at maintenance and risk factors – any person owning a property assumes risk and must plan for the challenges of property ownership. The building, the improvements, the location, or the tenant mix, can create risk matters and pressures.  See things for what they are and how they could challenge the investment performance.
  6. Review income and expenditure results – there will be a pattern of income and expenditure to review and consider. The last few years will have value to you when assessing passing income and net income.  The results of the last few years will help you set new budgets for the property given the existing tenants, leases, vacancies, and landlord targets.
  7. Talk to the landlord about expectations and reporting – every landlord will have certain requirements of reporting and control. The property will have income and capital value targets over time.  How can you report to that criteria for the current property owner?  Have you got a software property management program that allows you to report conveniently about the asset and the current results of income, leasing, and tenant activity?  The information that you gather from a property management handover will be captured into the software that you are using to manage the property.

So, there are many things on this list to investigate.  One thing or one question will lead to many others.   As you take on a new property to manage, be prepared for the information and the facts that come your way; take plenty of notes.