What to Expect in Industrial Property Sales and Leasing Brokerage

man working in industrial pipes
Industrial property sales and leasing is a special segment of the brokerage industry

In real estate brokerage, the industrial property market offers good levels of entry and activity.  Why is that so?  It is because the property type is ‘entry level’ for investors both in complexity and cost.  It is not hard for an agent to know what is going on in the industrial market place and get the facts of what a property investor in that segment may be looking for.

The aspiring brokers and agents that are starting up in the industry will find it easier to understand industrial property first and foremost.  From that point other property types can be incorporated into market activities and prospecting.

From a career perspective, and to help you get started in industrial property sales and leasing, here are some ideas:

  1. The industrial property market is usually the first to respond in an upturn and a downturn.  Watch the shifts in the economy to capture the market changes and listing opportunities.
  2. Businesses centred on manufacturing and bulky goods usually need larger premises to operate from.  They will chose locations that are relevant to regional raw materials, transport, customer demographics, occupancy costs, and business operations.  This then says that a top agent in industrial property will spend substantial time getting to know the local businesses and what they are looking for in business operations, expansion needs, and locational change.
  3. Some properties in this category can be tenant and business specific.  If that is the case, any landlord should take care in structuring a longer lease with appropriate make good clauses at lease end.  Also allow a reasonable lead time for a tenant making a decision on the exercise of an option.  If the landlord needs to find a new replacement tenant for a highly specialised property, it can take some time to achieve the placement.
  4. In this market segment, a top industrial property agent will work on both leasing and sales opportunities.  One thing can very well lead to another.
  5. With the predominance of industrial parks and the clustering of industrial tenants and businesses into the one location, there are special factors of knowledge that apply to the title types and the permitted uses under the leases.  Get to know how these things work and can fit into the zoning and planning regulations for the local area.
  6. Industrial properties will have configuration and improvement issues to understand.  That will include hardstand, warehousing, office space, staff amenities, car parking, security, and loading areas.  Use and configurations will change.  Get to know what tenants and businesses are looking for locally in property choice and occupancy.

So this is a good market type to enter into as a commercial and industrial property agent.  If you enjoy the market segment you can specialise for many years and achieve.

Commercial Agents – Industrial Property Inspection Tips

industrial warehouse
Inspecting industrial property is a complex process.

These are some of the general factors and concerns as they apply to industrial property and your inspection as a commercial real estate agent.  You may also identify other issues which can be included in your listing review process with any Landlord or Tenants.  These have been taken from a recent newsletter for our agent friends.

  • Industrial property needs to be well-positioned with due regard for transport routes and transport access.  Look at the road configuration and proximity with due regard to heavy transport access and deliveries to and from the property.
  • Some industrial tenants and properties require access to raw materials and the labour market.  This could involve public transport or ports, rail heads, and airports.  Look at the access issues here.
  • Power supply with industrial tenants is particularly important as they usually have a high load demands and extended hours of electrical load.  Can your tenants access the power they require easily?  It may be necessary for you to talk to the power grid authorities and the tenants in this regard.
  • Can the tenants dispatch their product easily into the transport corridors and transport facilities within the state?  This is particularly the main roads, airports, ports, and shipping facilities.
  • Is the property located in a recognised industrial area surrounded by good and busy industrial tenants?  Talk to some of the other local businesses to see what they think about the local area.
  • Are there any unsold properties or an abundance of vacancies in the industrial precinct and are tenants and properties in high demand?  Look at those vacancies and get details of the asking rent.
  • Does the precinct feature an abundance of investment type property or is there a balance of Owner Occupation in existence?  Could other tenants in the area be looking for properties to purchase and get away from the rental or lease issue?
  • What is the ratio of floor area between the office areas to the warehouse?  Is that ratio too high or too low given the trends of occupancy in the local area?  This will be relevant to the type of property and the customers that they service.
  • What is the height of the warehouse between the slab and the underside of the steel frame supporting the ceiling or roof area?  That dimension can oppose or restrict certain types of storage and/or access by transport vehicles.
  • What is the access to the warehouse area from the main road fronting the property, and how many roller doors service that access?   Are those roller doors motorised, do they allow the entry of modern semitrailer vehicles?  Is there a need for other access doors in the future and can they be easily installed?
  • Is there an abundance of good lighting, or natural lighting in the warehouse area providing good visibility?
  • What is the load tolerance of the warehouse floor for heavy vehicles, what are the dimensions of the floor surface slab and does it provide ease of access for loading vehicles and trolleys?
  • What are the dimensions between the supporting roof columns of the building?  This will dictate the types of storage and pelleting load area which may affect any future tenant occupancy.
  • What fire prevention systems and security systems exist in the premises that will be relevant to occupancy?
  • Is the building fully compliant with health, safety, and fire regulations?  It may be necessary for you to visit the local building authority to check this.
  • What is the external fabric of the building? Is it easily maintained, does it provide a quality appearance?
  • Is the internal warehouse suitably lined and insulated given the property usage that is expected?
  • Is the property flat and suitable for trucks and or loading? • Does the office area provide good quality presentation, services, amenities, and business environment which will support the tenant in their future occupancy?
  • Is there any asbestos in the building, and if so, is it documented and maintained within regulatory and legislative management practices?
  • Ask about environmental risks and threats from the property or from the occupancy.
  • Look at the local maps to see how the property fits into the location and the geography.  Look for things that can impact property usage such as rivers and creeks that could flood.  Look for slippage potential if the block is sloping or near steep areas.
  • What does the zoning of the property allow it to be used for?  Check out the local development plans.
  • Has the block been filled or re-levelled?  Get details of this.  It may be necessary for a soil report to satisfy buyers or tenants as to property suitability for their operations.

So you can add to this list based on your local area and the types of industrial tenants that you deal with.  Formulate a checklist from this and the other things that you can add. As part of the inspection process, take lots of photographs of the improvements and the property itself.  Loading areas and turning areas for trucks will be of real importance to many property owners, as will hardstand space in the property.

You can get more tips for commercial and industrial real estate agents at our website at http://www.commercial-realestate-training.com/

How to Win Your Sales Presentation and Make It Really Great

How can you close more property presentations and sales pitches? The pitches that we do as real estate agents in the one transaction are numerous. Think about these to name a few:

  • Pitch to get a meeting with the property owner
  • Pitch to get a listing opportunity
  • Negotiate on the listing creation
  • Sell the advertising package
  • Attract the right enquiry
  • Present the property to the buyer
  • Negotiate and close on the buyers offer
  • Negotiate with the seller regards the offer from the buyer

One of the real secrets in pitching your services or offering is to help put the client or other party in some degree of perceived control. In simple terms you give the client some options to consider around the key decision. When the client has options, they do not feel like they are being closed. The key decision becomes simpler and easier. I call this the ‘Option factor’.

The nature of the human mind and psyche is that it does not want to be forced or manipulated. You can use this ‘Option factor’ as a tool of negotiation in commercial real estate sales and leasing.

You can get more free tips and articles online for real estate agents at http://www.commercial-realestate-training.com/

Build Your Commercial Property Market and Sales Territory

When you work in commercial real estate sales and leasing, the territory dominance that you achieve is largely created by your own personal endeavours.

There are far too many ordinary salespeople out there today. When the property owner wants to sell or lease their property they really do need the agent with territory dominance. That is the agent that knows:

  • Where the enquiry is coming from
  • What the enquiry is looking for
  • The limitations on finance in the local market
  • The marketing campaigns that really work
  • What deals are being done and on what basis
  • How to draw in the right target market for the property.
  • When to close in on a genuine enquiry from a buyer or tenant
  • Has the majority of quality property listed in the local area

Whilst every agent should know and provide these things, the reality is that many do not do well on the performance specifics.

Looking at these simple issues, they are all related to things that you as the real estate agent can and should take to the seller or property owner as part of the sale or leasing campaign. This is where value and service stands alone as the best way to attract the client to your specific property solutions. Market and territory dominance supported by knowledge and experience will help you attract more quality listings.

You can see more of my free tips and articles for real estate agents at http://www.commercial-realestate-training.com/

Talk About Commercial Property and Its Liquidity

When working as a commercial real estate agent you will see many types of property in many situations and levels of quality. When it comes to selling the property, there is a factor known as the ‘liquidity factor’, and it will impact the sale and price outcome. In simple terms the ‘liquidity factor’ is the time it can take to sell the property.

By comparison to other types of investment, commercial property has a high liquidity factor as it takes time to sell it; usually days or weeks. The share market as an investment type is just the opposite with a low liquidity factor, as shares can be sold almost within the hour. People choose to invest in commercial property as it is relatively stable and less volatile than shares. There is however the liquidity factor to contend with when it comes to property sale time.

It pays to take the seller of the property through the liquidity discussion so the right choices are made when you take the property to the market for sale.

Essentially the ‘liquidity factor’ is all about the time the property will take to sell. It is driven by things such as these:

  1. Location of the property
  2. Tenant mix
  3. Anchor tenants
  4. Size of the property
  5. Amount of money required to purchase the property
  6. Lease profiles and documentation
  7. The age of the property in the local area
  8. Changes to the population locally
  9. Changes to the business sentiment locally
  10. Methods of sale to be adopted
  11. Identity of the property in the local area
  12. Price pressures locally
  13. Comparable or competing properties in the local area

All of these factors will have positives and negatives when it comes to the time of sale. Importantly it is up to you as the real estate agent to help the seller understand the ‘liquidity’ of the property and how it will impact the choices of property sale.

You can get other free tips and resources for real estate agents at http://www.commercial-realestate-training.com/

Secrets to Dominating Your Market as a Commercial Real Estate Agent

As a real estate agent myself of many years, I hear the words ‘territory domination’ used in many ways. Every experienced sales person and agent wants to dominate their territory and the competition agents in the area. So what does it mean?  You can check out some of my thoughts below and also at http://www.commercial-realestate-training.com/

Here are a few things that it means to me:

  1. Getting a greater share than anyone else in quality enquiry for property to buy or rent
  2. Having more landlords coming to you to rent or lease their property
  3. Having more sellers coming to you to sell their commercial real estate
  4. Having the best quality listings in the local area on your books to sell or rent
  5. Having no problem at all in converting new business to exclusive listings of a reasonable length of time
  6. Attracting other agents unsold or unrented listings to you for a fresh listing
  7. Having the best salespeople with other agents ring you up to look for a job

Every agent would like most of these facts and events in their business. So just how do you get to the pinnacle of territory domination as a real estate agent? After working with the top agencies and with some great people over the years I have set some rules or secrets to the process:

  • Work hard personally at prospecting each and every day in your business
  • Get as many quality signs into your territory as possible on good quality listings
  • Service your listings with great attention to detail and target market every single listing
  • Monitor your marketing efforts so you know what works and what doesn’t
  • Use the internet as a massive marketing tool and keep abreast of the changes and systems evolving from it
  • Send out success letters to property owners and businesses around every property you sell or lease
  • Concentrate on two markets of people, the business owners and leaders, and the property owners and investors. Both of them will give you significant opportunity
  • Set up a constant contact process of keeping in touch every 90 days with prospects so you are top of mind.
  • Be honest, trustworthy, knowledgeable, and skilful in your commercial real estate talents

Great salespeople create great market share. Start working on these things right now.  Great salespeople take control of their own destiny.

Commercial Estate Brokers – Prospecting and Cold Calling Success

Do you want more commissions and listings?  You simply have to be great at prospecting and cold calling.  The rest of your business will follow.

Guess what? Most real estate agents and brokers are not sufficiently disciplined to do the right levels of prospecting on a daily basis.  That is the most significant opportunity that exists in the property industry; you just have to be better than the rest at prospecting.  Sure listing, negotiating, and closing are other important skills, but they will come as a natural by-product of prospecting.

Focus on cold calling and prospecting. So how do you do this?  You set some prospecting rules and you start practice.  The words ‘rules’ and ‘practice’ are another couple of problem words for many in the industry.  Many struggle with doing both.

So let’s get away from the negative and presume you have the determination, the focus, and the drive to prospect for new business on a daily basis.  Here is a ‘killer prospecting model’ that really works.  The rest will be up to you.  This model takes 3 hours a day, 5 days per week. 

  1. There are no gaps and Saturdays and Sundays are the only days off in the prospecting process.  That is the first rule; probably the most important.
  2. The second rule in the process is that you must prospect on the telephone in the morning because after that you will be distracted by other things and not stick to it.  Without going deeply into it, there are established facts of personal performance in business that show the morning is the right time to do prospecting.
  3. Get away from setting any meetings in the morning.  Tell the boss that you prospect at that time and that you would prefer to set meetings with him and anyone else in the afternoons.  Even meetings with clients and prospects should not occur in the morning unless it is an absolute necessity.  The only reason to break the rule is if the meeting is for an active deal that is closing.
  4. The 3 hours of prospecting each day in the office is done from the telephone.  In commercial real estate you are predominantly dealing with business people and they generally will take your call if commercial real estate is an issue for them.  If it is not an issue then you simply move on.  Do not set up a meeting with someone who has no interest; remember that your time is precious.
  5. Drop the cold calling scripts and use your own words; that will be the way you will feel comfortable with the process.  Use trigger words to flow the discussion, but do not use scripts as the listener will sense the processes and turn off.
  6. Know that it takes you about 20 minutes of cold calling every day to get the process into momentum.  Once you are through the 20 minutes you must keep going and not stop for 2.5 hours.  In that way you will make progress.
  7. Find a quiet place to make your calls so that you can focus without distraction.  Your success in tele-prospecting depends on it.
  8. Research your call list the night before so you do not waste critical call time in research.  This is critical to the call process.
  9. Create a series of simple forms to use in the call process so that you can capture the results later in the database.  You must not stop the call momentum.
  10. Try to contact 10 new people on the telephone each day.  If they are not in the office when you call then simply make a note to call back.  You should be able to make 50 calls in 3 hours.
  11. Your only reason for calling prospects is to see if they have a need or an interest in commercial property.  When you really understand that yourself, then the calls will be easier and the quality of the discussion will be higher.
  12. Have a great database to record everything.  Use something that you are comfortable with.  At the basic end of the database alternatives you can use Microsoft Outlook, or Access.  Both are useful, low cost and user friendly.  When you want to move to something more relevant to the property industry you can spend many hundreds dollars; personally I believe you can do very well with the basics providing you know how to use a computer well (in that you have no choice).

These are the rules that you need to set in your cold call prospecting.  After you set the rules, you start the practice and you will need to do that for a couple of weeks until things are moving well.  To your success in commercial real estate prospecting!  You can get more detail on prospecting and cold calling in real estate here at http://www.commercial-realestate-training.com/