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Things to do in a Commercial Property Management Handover

high rise buildings

If you are about to take on a new commercial or retail property from a management perspective, there are things to think about.  There are things to think about and the property management handover is critical to gathering the right information.  Every client and every property will have unique issues to prepare for and ask questions about. (NB – you can get plenty of property management tips in our Snapshot program right here – its free)

 

Handover Importance

There is something to remember here about a property handover and why it is so important; you only have a short period to get the full information about the property and its performance over time.  Questions must be asked of the previous property manager, owner, or tenants.

 

Stay Organised

An organised approach with a checklist as part of a handover process is a good thing to work with.  A checklist will keep you on focus and task for the property type.  Different questions are asked when it comes to the different properties.

So here are my experiences and ideas relating to taking over a complex commercial or retail property.  Preparation is the key to success in capturing all the recent and relevant property detail.  You may be able to add to the list based on the location and the landlord:

  1. Check out the physical aspects of the property – it always helps if you visit the property first before you do other things. The visual aspects of the property will help you significantly with investigations and questions.
  2. Review the tenancy mix – in a property with several tenants, look at the types of businesses, location of each tenant, and the performance of the property for the tenants in situ. Some tenant types put pressures on the property such as security or staff issues.
  3. Review all the leases relating to occupancy – the leases will have unique elements of occupancy to review. All leases should be read; extracts and critical dates should be taken from each lease where you can see important facts impacting occupancy.
  4. Understand the vacancy factors – any vacancy now or in the future is an issue. Resolve vacancies through a tenant retention plan, a marketing plan, or a targeted leasing program.  You can also move existing tenants around the property.  Think outside the square when it comes to tenant movement and placement.
  5. Look at maintenance and risk factors – any person owning a property assumes risk and must plan for the challenges of property ownership. The building, the improvements, the location, or the tenant mix, can create risk matters and pressures.  See things for what they are and how they could challenge the investment performance.
  6. Review income and expenditure results – there will be a pattern of income and expenditure to review and consider. The last few years will have value to you when assessing passing income and net income.  The results of the last few years will help you set new budgets for the property given the existing tenants, leases, vacancies, and landlord targets.
  7. Talk to the landlord about expectations and reporting – every landlord will have certain requirements of reporting and control. The property will have income and capital value targets over time.  How can you report to that criteria for the current property owner?  Have you got a software property management program that allows you to report conveniently about the asset and the current results of income, leasing, and tenant activity?  The information that you gather from a property management handover will be captured into the software that you are using to manage the property.

So, there are many things on this list to investigate.  One thing or one question will lead to many others.   As you take on a new property to manage, be prepared for the information and the facts that come your way; take plenty of notes.

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Shopping Center Management Strategies that Really Work

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Shopping Center Management is largely about the customer.

The shopping centre management process is quite special in so many ways. That is why only certain brokers and agents take up the challenge of retail leasing, management, and sales. There are things to know and things to do. The benchmarks and the indicators are different in ‘retail’.

 

(N.B. these ideas are also sent out to regularly to our friends in Commercial Real Estate Online Snapshot to help amplify brokerage results…. Get your access here)

The goals and targets that are standard to the retail process are usually improving income, reducing vacancy factors, and keeping your good tenants for the long term. You could say that they are the major internal factors of property performance for a typical retail property or shopping centre today.

 

Know the Retail Factors of Influence

So what else do you need to think about? In addition to the nominated items, there are the ‘external factors’ that are harder to control. The external factors are typically shopper spending patterns, shop visits, frequency of shopping, and the amount of money spent on average per shopper. The marketing of the property will be part of the overall plan.

 

You can now see why a property performance plan is really important in any retail property today. So let’s put some of this together.

 

To keep all of these things in balance and on track there are a few business factors to implement in the running of a retail shopping centre. Here are some of them:

 

  1. Develop a business plan – A business plan in retail shopping centre performance is and should be all encompassing, generally covering all the issues of the daily running of the property and the involvement of tenants, customers, and investors. With a good business plan, you can make choices when it comes to rentals, tenant movement, renewals of leases, and property expenditure.
  2. Know your tenants and their priorities – Some tenants will be trading more successfully than others. Look for the differences to see what can be done with trading and sales. It is wise to look into gross profit and net profit margins with any tenancy group. The averages will tell you if a tenant is trading more successfully than others.
  3. Review all of your leases – The shop lease is the foundation of income recovery and growth over time; with all leases you must know how they work and what is involved in enforcing lease conditions when matters of change or risk occur. Each lease is different so you will need to build a profile of the tenant’s lease and the critical dates. Track the critical dates so you can take action early in any issue or problem.
  4. Establish a tenant retention plan – Differentiate your tenants so that you are protecting and encouraging the best tenants to stay in the property for the long term. They may need encouragement, so a tenant retention plan lets you set the rules to the process.
  5. Watch the sales and trading figures – You can watch these figures if you have the cooperation of the tenants in the property. You can gain and protect that cooperation through the terms of the lease. From those figures you create graphs that show moving annual turnover (MAT) and sales in merchandise or retail segments. Ideally the tenants in the property should have to produce turnover figures for their shop on a monthly basis. From that point it is easy to see the retail segments that are selling products well, and also the other segments that may be struggling. That is where the tenant placement and tenant mix then has a valuable strategy for the property. You can build clusters of tenants around the property so that customer interest is encouraged and sales are boosted between like or complementary tenants.
  6. Develop a marketing plan for the shopping centre – A plan of this type will allow for the retail sales seasons at different times of the year. There will also be themes for the local area and customer interest.
  7. Reduce vacancies with a tenant retention plan – The only reason you need vacancies in a property is when you are about to renovate and move tenants around. A few vacancies will give you the flexibility to change the property. When you look at the total tenant mix in a property, some tenants will be more important than others to the future of the asset. That is where the tenant mix plan comes in; you decide who you want to keep in the property and for what reason. You then build a rent a leasing plan around those factors.

 

So there are some good things that you can do here with retail shopping centre leasing. Understand the property in a comprehensive way. Then you can match the property strategically into the location and the customer demographic.

(N.B. these ideas are also sent out to regularly to our friends in Commercial Real Estate Online Snapshot to help amplify brokerage results…. Get your access here)

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Shopping Center Managers – How to Assess and Improve Retail Shopping Center Performance Comprehensively

woman with shopping bag
Understand the reasons behind and for a successful shopping center.

A retail property and particularly a shopping centre is a special asset in many different ways.  It takes skill and knowledge to make something of property performance.

There are numerous things to put in the retail ‘balance’.  Special strategies are required.  Are you up to the retail challenge?

Understand the retail facts

So what are the variables that make this so challenging?  Consider these for starters:

  • Tenants struggling to make sales – Some tenants will always struggle given that they may not be offering the right products or services. They may also be inexperienced in retail trade and sales.  If you have a difficult tenant in a property  it is perhaps better to move them on at the end of their lease (assuming that they can trade until the end of lease)
  • A tenant mix that just doesn’t work for one reason or another – A poor group of tenants with weaknesses will quickly slow customer interest and repeat visits. That weakness then leads to sales decline.  You must quickly fix a retail shopping centre tenant mix if you have issues that are weaknesses and impacting property performance.
  • Vacancies currently in the property or those that can be expected – When you have empty shops to resolve, ensure that you are coming up with immediate strategies such as creating short term occupancy and placing marketing material in the empty space. Customers will see the vacancy so build some ‘vibrancy’ into the empty space.
  • Market rentals and strategies for the property – Understand what the rents are doing for the property type in your region. How does your property compare?
  • Outgoings recovery from the tenants – The lease documentation will be important when it comes to outgoings strategies and recoveries. The rent types used in the property will also have an impact.
  • Customers and their spending patterns – At different times of the year the sales results change for the retail sector. Watch the process and how it is impacting your tenant mix.
  • Lease documentation that is complex and critical to occupation – Understand all of the leases in the property. Some will be better than others.
  • Landlord net income requirements – The landlord will have expectations when it comes to the net income they achieve. The expenditure in the property will place pressures on cash flow.  Understand how those things work in your retail property.
  • Retail sales patterns for the region – Always look at shopping and sales trends for the region. Understand if your property is being pressured by other properties locally.  Understand why that is the case and try to fix the weakness.
  • The configuration and presentation of the property – It is a fact that any retail property will be higher in upkeep so costs and strategies will be required. The presentation and functionality of the property has to be at the standards expected by customers.  In that way the customers can keep coming back to the shopping centre.  A retail property will soon be in decline if maintenance and presentational factors and lacking.

Every one of these issues can demand specific focus and effort from you as the specialist broker to bring about a resolve for all concerned.

So if you are a retail property manager or specialist leasing manager, you will know the importance of what I am saying here.  Are you up to the retail challenge?  Can you handle these issues in a comprehensive way?  Plan and improve retail property performance from a base of personal retail skill, knowledge and strategy.

You  can get more tips and ideas about retail property performance in our eCourse ‘Snapshot’ right here.

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Asset Management Tips for Commercial Property Managers Today

Have you ever wondered about the issues and elements that make up an asset plan in commercial or retail property?  Here are some tips to help you understand some of the things to put into your plan.

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Agent Success in Commercial Property Management Today

modern office property and car park
Top properties need top commercial property managers

Commercial property management is a challenging part of the property business if you are going to do it properly.  Complex properties require good managers that understand the property type and just how to keep things under control

It is hard to take up a position in looking after some properties without a qualified and experienced person to help you.  Whilst the theory of property management can be studied, the practical experience will always help you greatly and fast track your learning curve.  There are significant differences in the management style between industrial, office, and retail property.

Here are some of the things that are central to your job:

  • Watching the trends of the market with focus on market rentals, vacancies, competing properties, supply and demand for premises, and new developments.
  • Income and expenditure performance for properties in your area.  Knowing the industry averages will help you a lot in keeping things under control.  It should also be said that some properties will perform differently based on their property type and location.  That is why specialisation is relevant in property management.
  • When it comes to properties of medium to larger size, the establishment of a budget relating to income and expenditure is quite normal.  The budget can only be set with due regard to property history, location, and other properties of similar type.  Getting to know the competing properties and other property managers will help you in establishment of the budget for your managed assets.
  • The current tenancy mix and the vacancy profile for the property will have direct impact on the income stream.  That is why the market rentals, current lease profiles, and expected vacancies need to be carefully managed.  Many managers will do their own leasing as part of the property management services.  That should normally be the case however there should also be a separate fee for completed and successful negotiated leases.  There will also be differences in leasing fees as it applies to leases of different types and different terms.
  • Many property owners will have specific needs when it comes to cash flow.  They will need to service financial obligations to the mortgagee, as well as payment of expected outgoings to run the property.  That is why your experience and control become part of the property management service.  The manager should understand exactly what’s happening in the property today and how the expenses are going to change cash flow over the forthcoming period.

A good manager will bring stability to an Investment Property.  Stability then allows the property to be improved over time to the plans and the priorities of the landlord.  It should also be said that a reasonable fee should be charged for commercial or retail property management services.  There are no short cuts when it comes to quality in this industry, hence a suitable fee should be paid for professional commercial and retail property management services.

You can get more tips for Commercial Property Managers in our Newsletter right here.